Minglewood Hall

A Rich Tradition of Music at Minglewood Hall

The history of Minglewood Blues is long and complex. The original Minglewood Blues, written by Noah Lewis, was recorded on January 30, 1928 in Memphis,TN by Cannons Jug Stompers featuring Gus Cannon on Banjo/Jug, Ashley Thomson on Guitar/Vocal, & Noah Lewis on Harmonica.

“New Minglewood Blues” was a complete rewrite of the song “Minglewood Blues” that Noah Lewis had previously recorded with Canon’s Jug Stompers in 1928.  Eric Levy discovered a verse in a song called “It Won’t Be Long” recorded by Charley Patton in 1929 that may be a source for Noah Lewis’s “New Minglewood Blues” recorded two years later.

You ever go down to Memphis, stop by Minglewood
You ever go down to Memphis, stop by Minglewood
You Memphis women don’ mean no man no good

New Minglewood Blues was recorded by the Noah Lewis Jug Band on November 26, 1930 in Memphis. This recording includes Noah on harmonica, John Estes on guitar, Yank Rachel on mandolin and an unknown jug player. This version is very similar to New Minglewood Blues as played and recorded by the Grateful Dead. New Minglewood Blues by Noah Lewis

I was born in the desert, raised in a lion’s den
I was born in the desert, raised in a lion’s den
My number one occupation, stealin’ women from their monkey men
If you’re ever in Memphis, better stop by Minglewood
If you’re ever in Memphis, better stop by Minglewood
The women down there, they don’t mean a man no good
I was born in the desert, raised in a lion’s den
I was born in the desert, raised in a lion’s den
My number one occupation, stealin’ women from their monkey men

The Grateful Dead’s version on their first LP was a modified version of the song by Noah Lewis, recorded in 1930, on which it was originally based (“New Minglewood Blues”):

I was born in a desert, raised in a lion’s den
I was born in a desert, raised in a lion’s den
And my regular occupation is seeking women from other men
When you come to Memphis, please stop by Minglewood
When you come to Memphis, please stop by Minglewood
There women [??] don’t mean no man no good

“New Minglewood Blues” was itself a complete rewrite of the song “Minglewood Blues” that Noah Lewis had previously recorded with Canon’s Jug Stompers in 1928:

Don’t you never let no woman worry your mind
Don’t you never let no woman worry your mind
Then she keep you worried, worried all the time
Don’t you wish your [?faro] was little and cute like mine
Don’t you wish your [?faro] was little and cute like mine
She’s a married woman, but she comes to me sometime
Well I got a letter Lord, and you heard it read
Well I got a letter Lord, and you heard it read
Baby I’m coming back baby, and now be on your way

Portions of the history of Minglewood taken from here.

The Myth of Minglewood: An Interesting Story by someone looking for the Myth!

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