Event Details

Drivin' N' Cryin'

Minglewood Hall Presents

Drivin' N' Cryin'

Great Peacock, Thomas Wynn & the Believers

Sun, February 14, 2016

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

1884 Lounge

Memphis, TN

$15.00 - $17.00

This event is 18 and over

Drivin' N' Cryin'
Drivin' N' Cryin'
Formed in Atlanta in 1986, the hard-rocking, Southern roots music-steeped Drivin' n' Cryin' were never embraced on a national level, but have reigned supreme in the region during their tenure. Originally made up of singer/songwriter Kevin Kinney on guitar and vocals, Tim Nielsen on bass, and Paul Lenz on drums, the band's debut was the timeless hard rock/bluegrass fusion Scarred But Smarter (1986) on 688 Records, the label that grew out of the punk-era Atlanta club of the same name. The band followed with Whisper Tames the Lion in 1988 for Island, and replaced Lenz with Jeff Sullivan on drums. There were high hopes for Drivin' n' Cryin' at the time due to the success of R.E.M.; all things Southern were tipped to become the next big thing. But the band's uniquely Southern spin on rock was lost on the rest of the world.

Persevering with Mystery Road, with the addition of R.E.M. guitar roadie Buren Fowler on lead guitar, the band didn't alter its style all that much. For Fly Me Courageous (1990), the band finally took on the heavy metal mantle and ended up with a good hard rock record, with the odd folk track thrown in. The result was perhaps shocking and less than fashionable in the years when alternative music was just coming into its own. The greatest strength of Drivin' n' Cryin' was as a live band, as they toured tirelessly around the South, drawing an enthusiastic, college-age audience. A Drivin' n' Cryin' show in Atlanta had to be seen to be believed -- the sound of the crowd singing along would actually drown out Kinney's own unusually strong voice. That same year, Kinney recorded the beautiful acoustic folk LP MacDougal Blues for Island.

Smoke, the next album from Drivin' n' Cryin', was released by Island in 1993 and ultimately finished the band's liaison with the label. It was followed by another, even sparer solo album by Kinney, Down Out Law (Mammoth) in 1994. He accompanied his solo releases by touring with R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck, who produced the first album, while he and the band also filled the gap between their fifth and sixth records performing acoustic dates throughout the South.

By the time the more gentle Wrapped in Sky, the band's Geffen debut in 1996, hit the shelves, Drivin' n' Cryin' were nearly forgotten -- lost in the void where many bands of their generation would find themselves in the wake of grunge. Kinney, Nielsen, and Sullivan held strong -- with the addition of Joey Huffman on keyboards for Wrapped in Sky. Fowler left the fold shortly thereafter, but the band continued to record, releasing the self-titled Drivin' N' Cryin' in 1997. A live set, The Essential Live Drivin' n' Cryin', showed up in 1999. Next up was a four-song EP, Detroit City Rock, in 2003, followed by another studio album, The Great American Bubble Factory, in 2009.

Embracing the immediacy and thematic possibilities of the EP format, the band formed its own label, New Records, and began issuing a series of five-song EPs, beginning with Songs from the Laundromat in 2012. A second EP, Songs About Cars, Space and the Ramones, also appeared in 2012. Early 2013 brought the third of four planned EPs Songs from the Psychedelic Time Clock, a collection of throwbacks to the early days of garage and 60's psyche.
Great Peacock
Great Peacock
You can call Great Peacock a folk band... but don't expect them to make music for campfires or square dances. Raised in the Deep South and headquartered in Nashville, they're a group of red-blooded country boys who aren't afraid of the big city. Case in point: Making Ghosts -- the duo's harmony-heavy, guitar-driven debut album -- whose 11 songs find the middle ground between rootsy, down-home Americana and super-sized arena pop/rock.

"To us, it's just pop music with organic acoustic instruments," says Andrew Nelson, who shares lead vocals and guitar duties with co-founder Blount Floyd. "The album has some fiddle, some pedal steel and a whole lot of acoustic guitar, which sounds like the traditional setup for a country band. But this isn't a country record. It's not really a folk record, either. It's a pop/record... with folk tendencies."

Nelson and Floyd first crossed paths in their early 20s, bonding instantly over a shared love of cheap beer and good Southern music. After logging several years together in a loud, Tennessee-based rock band, they split off to form their own project, swapping out the amplified swagger of their previous group for a straightforward sound anchored by acoustic guitars, anthemic melodies and two intertwined voices. Like an old-school harmony duo retuned for a new generation, they started off with a handful of classic influences -- the country croon of George Jones, the working class rock & roll of Bruce Springsteen, the heartland hum of Tom Petty -- and expanded their sound from there, turning Great Peacock into the sort of band that's simultaneously rooted in tradition and headed toward new territory.

The music on Making Ghosts reflects Great Peacock's ambition. Songs like "Tennessee" are swooning, sweeping tributes to the band's homeland, while "Take Me To The Mountain" pushes the band toward anthemic territory, fueled by super-sized drums and a radio-ready melody. On "Arms," the guys jump between haunting verses and big, Technicolor choruses, capping everything off with a screeching guitar solo. These peacocks know how to strut their stuff.

What's in a name, by the way? In Great Peacock's case, quite a bit.

"We initially thought it was just a funny name for a band," Nelson admits, "but through the evolution of everything we've done, we've always been big and colorful. That's why Blount jumps around onstage. That's why I wear a suit jacket embroidered with feathers, which is basically a poor man's nudie suit. We've embraced the image of the big peacock feathers, and we want to entertain you. We look that way, we think that way, and we sound that way, too."
Thomas Wynn & the Believers
Thomas Wynn & the Believers
Southern Rock Muscle ~ Soulful Rock n' Blues"

A combination of blistering rock and southern soul, sibling-led Thomas Wynn and The Believers is a 6-piece fiery ensemble dubbed by Soundboard as "Southern Rock Muscle ~ Soulful Rock n' Blues." Gibson-sponsored from Orlando, Florida, TW&TB is known for their powerful LIVE performances playing the original music circuit and making "believers" wherever they go. The band personifies a new era that truly crosses generations with just really, really, really good music. If you like Tom Petty, The Band, The Black Crowes, CCR & Pink Floyd, you'll love The Believers!

For the sixth consecutive year, Thomas Wynn and The Believers repeatedly reigns as Central Florida's #1 Rock Band. Orlando Weekly's Best of Orlando Readers' Choice again crowned TW&TB as their Rock favorite (plus #1 Folk/Country Band and #2 singer-songwriter accolades for the band's namesake TW.)

Wynn's spirit-moving vocals, passionate lyrics, and emotional delivery are uniquely supported by sister Olivia's engaging and captivating voice and presence. Her strong vocal harmonies (the other lead) and wide-eyed response is the perfect companion to her brother's yearning banshee cries. The duo calls their perfect blend "blood harmonies"; the press calls the tandem thunder "their secret weapon." Backed by an explosive tight band, they've crafted a new vein of rock -- gritty, yet pure uplifting Soul Rock, a mixture of the classics, R&B and gospel -- creating a sound that has an identity of its own.

Georgia Music Hall Of Famer Alan Walden says, "One of the newest, brightest, tightest, smoothest, most energetic bands to ever come through." Reax Music Magazine states "For once, you have a Florida band that is truly Florida. They look like Florida, they sound like Florida - with a touch of Molly Hatchett, The Band, Neil Young, and The Black Crowes. Not fad hipster, not transplant Florida, but Florida Florida. These guys are on the leading edge of creating a new southern rock scene." Best New Bands writes, "They embody everything authentic and raw."

Hailing from a musical family, the siblings are heavily influenced by their father, Tom Wynn, the original drummer of the country-rockers Cowboy, one of Macon-based Capricorn Studio's (Allman Brothers Band, Marshall Tucker Band, Elvin Bishop, Wet Willie) legendary bands from the 1970s. His influence, as well as their faith and church upbringing, undoubtedly shaped their songwriting and musical interests. Their deeply-rooted principles certainly laid the foundation for what the Wynns bring to The Believers' sound.

Their musical history begins with The Wynn Brothers Band (2005-2008) -- the first family endeavor co-led with older brother Jordan ( bass guitar) that also included Papa Wynn on drums. The band released Feel the Good (2006), the title track a signature song still performed today. But when marriages and other separate goals emerged, the Brothers' band became defunct . . . but by mid 2009, a new direction and desire to continue birthed the band as it's known today, with Thomas and Olivia at the helm . . .
Venue Information:
1884 Lounge
1555 Madison Ave.
Memphis, TN, 38104